Can an old company turn modern?

92 x served & 16 x viewed

I read Gary Hamel’s new book The Future of Man­age­ment with enthu­si­asm and frus­tra­tion. He sets the tone already in the pre­face with the fol­low­ing state­ment:

Most com­pan­ies have a roughly sim­il­ar man­age­ment hier­archy (a cas­cade of EVPs, SVPs, and VPs). They have ana­log­ous con­trol sys­tems, HR prac­tices and plan­ning rituals, and rely on com­par­able report­ing struc­tures and review sys­tems. That’s why it’s so easy for a CEO to jump from one com­pany to anoth­er…

His main mes­sage (to me) is about util­ising the col­lect­ive power of the organ­isa­tion in all decision mak­ing, which calls for open­ness and a lot of lat­er­al com­mu­nic­a­tion. Unfor­tu­nately, lat­er­al com­mu­nic­a­tion is too often blocked by hier­arch­ic­al struc­tures.

Maybe I am a “romantic” (just as Gary Hamel?) who is so inspired by the book that I want to begin a cru­sade against 19th cen­tury man­age­ment prin­ciples. Would it not be fant­ast­ic if one of the many dino­saur com­pan­ies could change?

Watch an excerpt from a speech by Gary:
Con­tinu­ous Man­age­ment Innov­a­tion: What, Why and How?

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