iPad and Kindle Reading Speeds

Reading on the beach

81 x served & 25 x viewed

In one of his What­They­Think Videos, Frank Romano aler­ted me on an inter­est­ing study on the usab­il­ity of eBooks. The ori­gin­al art­icle was from Jakob Nielsen’s Alert­box, July 2, 2010.  It was a fairly small study com­pris­ing only 24 people. Each per­son was tried on four read­ing con­di­tions: a prin­ted book, a PC, an iPad, and a Kindle 2.

The text was a short story by Ern­est Hem­ing­way, which accord­ing to Frank is easy to read, because it’s all simple sen­tences, vir­tu­ally no semi­colons, no em-dashes, it is basic writ­ing.  The res­ult was that read­ing the e-book ver­sion was slightly slower than read­ing the print. Both the iPad and the Kindle rated as high in terms of sat­is­fac­tion as the prin­ted book.  But the test per­sons were not happy with the PC — read­ing a PC felt like being at work.  The con­clu­sion is that well-designed eBook read­ers provide as good a read­ing envir­on­ment as the prin­ted book. With the strong devel­op­ment of tab­lets, there is obvi­ously a strong future for eBooks. This future is maybe already here, since Amazon recently repor­ted that Kindle books are out­selling prin­ted books.

The prin­ted book may still be pre­ferred on the beach

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